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INDICATION: ABILIFY® (aripiprazole) is a prescription medicine used to treat depression in adults as an add-on treatment to an antidepressant when an antidepressant alone is not enough.

IMPORTANT WARNING ON SUICIDALITY AND ANTIDEPRESSANT DRUGS: Children, adolescents, and young adults taking antidepressants for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and other psychiatric disorders are at an increased risk of suicidal thinking and behavior. More

U.S. FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION, including Boxed WARNINGS, and Medication Guide.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION and INDICATION for ABILIFY:
U.S. FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION, including Boxed WARNINGS, and Medication Guide.

Antidepressants may increase suicidal thoughts or behaviors in some children, teenagers, and young adults, especially within the first few months of treatment or when the dose is changed. Depression and other serious mental illnesses are themselves associated with an increase in the risk of suicide. Patients on antidepressants and their families or caregivers should watch for new or worsening depression symptoms, unusual changes in behavior, or thoughts of suicide. Such symptoms should be reported to the patient's healthcare provider right away, especially if they are severe or occur suddenly. ABILIFY®(aripiprazole) is not approved for use in pediatric patients with depression. See More Safety Information

INDICATION: ABILIFY (aripiprazole) is prescribed as an add-on treatment for adults with depression when an antidepressant alone is not enough.

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Please answer all questions
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Enter Address:

Please e-mail your answers to yourself so you can print them out and take them with you to your next doctor visit. Keep in mind that sending your answers through e-mail does not guarantee the security and privacy of your personal health information. Please take reasonable steps, like confirming e-mail addresses before you send, to help keep your information secure.

Tools for Talking With Your Doctor

The tools in this section may help you discuss your depression and your treatment with your doctor. Start by selecting one of the tools below, and take the information to your next appointment.

Depression Questionnaire

If you’re being treated for depression with an antidepressant that you’ve been taking for at least 6 weeks and think you still have depression symptoms, this questionnaire could help guide your discussion with your doctor about your treatment plan.

For each question, choose an answer that best describes the level of your symptoms over the past week, including today.

Please note: This is not a formal diagnostic tool. Only a healthcare professional can diagnose depression. Always follow the healthcare advice of your doctor. Do not change the way you take your medication without talking with your doctor.

Adapted from the Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale (CUDOS), developed by Mark Zimmerman, MD, Director of Outpatient Psychiatry at Rhode Island Hospital. Compr Psychiatry. Mar-Apr 2008;49(2):131-140.

During the past week, including today:

  1. 1-10
  2. 11-16
1. I felt sad or depressed
2. I was not as interested in my usual activities
3. My appetite was poor and I didn't feel like eating
4. My appetite was much greater than usual
5. I had difficulty sleeping
6. I was sleeping too much
7. I felt very fidgety, making it difficult to sit still
8. I felt physically slowed down, like my body was stuck in mud
9. My energy level was low
10. I felt guilty
11. I thought I was a failure
12. I had problems concentrating
13. I had more difficulties making decisions than usual
14. I wished I was dead
15. I thought about killing myself
16. I thought that the future looked hopeless
Overall, how much have symptoms of depression interfered with or caused difficulties in your life during the past week?

Total Score:

0

What does your score mean?

If your score was 11 or higher, you may still be experiencing symptoms of depression. At your next appointment, be sure to let your doctor know, and ask if adding ABILIFY to your antidepressant could help.

Print

and take to your next appointment.

Start the Conversation

If you are on an antidepressant and still feeling depressed, that may not seem like the easiest thing to bring up with your doctor. So if you’re having trouble finding the right thing to say, consider these conversation starters and feel free to put them in your own words.

We've been treating with the same antidepressant for a while now, but I'm still experiencing some symptoms.
Is there something more we can do to treat them?
My antidepressant is helping, but my depression is still affecting me at work, at home, and in my social life.
Should we consider adding something else?
I'm glad I’ve made some progress on my antidepressant, but I'm not feeling as well as I'd like to.
What else can we do without starting over?

Consider Adding ABILIFY (aripiprazole)

If you’ve been on an antidepressant for at least 6 weeks and still feel depressed, adding ABILIFY could be right for you. To find out, review the questions to the right and discuss them with your doctor.

  • How might ABILIFY help treat my unresolved symptoms of depression?
  • Does adding ABILIFY mean I have to change my current treatment?
  • How is ABILIFY thought to work?
  • What side effects should I know about?
  • How soon might I start to see improvement in my symptoms?
  • Based on my overall health and current treatment, might ABILIFY be right for me?

Important Safety Information

Increases in blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) can happen in some people who take ABILIFY (aripiprazole). Extremely high blood sugar can lead to coma or death. If you have diabetes, or risk factors (for example, obesity, family history of diabetes), or have the following symptoms: increases in thirst, urination, or hunger, feel weak or tired, sick to your stomach, or confused (or breath smells fruity), your blood sugar should be monitored.
See More Safety Information

"At every appointment, I would make sure that I came in with a list of questions that we could go over." —Kalene, real ABILIFY patient

Kalene is taking ABILIFY (aripiprazole) along with her antidepressant to help treat her unresolved symptoms of depression. She has volunteered to share her experience and has not been paid by the makers of ABILIFY. Individual results may vary.

Download Brochure

Learn more about ABILIFY and what to discuss with your doctor. Download this brochure

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You May Not Have to Start Over ABILIFY is meant to be taken in addition to an antidepressant—not instead of it. More

Error

Please answer all questions
before proceeding.

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Unresolved Symptoms of Depression?

Tools for Talking With Your Doctor

The tools in this section may help you discuss your depression and your treatment with your doctor. Start by selecting one of the tools below, and take the information to your next appointment.

Tools for Talking With Your Doctor

Depression Questionnaire

If you’re being treated for depression with an antidepressant that you’ve been taking for at least 6 weeks and think you still have depression symptoms, this questionnaire could help guide your discussion with your doctor about your treatment plan.

For each question, choose an answer that best describes the level of your symptoms over the past week, including today.

Please note: This is not a formal diagnostic tool. Only a healthcare professional can diagnose depression. Always follow the healthcare advice of your doctor. Do not change the way you take your medication without talking with your doctor.

Adapted from the Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale (CUDOS), developed by Mark Zimmerman, MD, Director of Outpatient Psychiatry at Rhode Island Hospital. Compr Psychiatry. Mar-Apr 2008;49(2):131-140.

During the past week, including today:

  • 1. I felt sad or depressed
  • 2. I was not as interested in my usual activities
  • 3. My appetite was poor and I didn't feel like eating
  • 4. My appetite was much greater than usual
  • 5. I had difficulty sleeping
  • 6. I was sleeping too much
  • 7. I felt very fidgety, making it difficult to sit still
  • 8. I felt physically slowed down, like my body was stuck in mud
  • 9. My energy level was low
  • 10. I felt guilty
  • 11. I thought I was a failure
  • 12. I had problems concentrating
  • 13. I had more difficulties making decisions than usual
  • 14. I wished I was dead
  • 15. I thought about killing myself
  • 16. I thought that the future looked hopeless
  • Overall, how much have symptoms of depression interfered with or caused difficulties in your life during the past week?
  • If you ever have suicidal thoughts, call your doctor or 911, or go to an emergency room. Take suicidal thoughts seriously and get help immediately.

    The information that you provide is intended for you and your doctor. It will not be stored, collected, or disseminated by Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc. for any reason.

Enter Address:

Please e-mail your answers to yourself so you can print them out and take them with you to your next doctor visit. Keep in mind that sending your answers through e-mail does not guarantee the security and privacy of your personal health information. Please take reasonable steps, like confirming e-mail addresses before you send, to help keep your information secure.

Tools for Talking With Your Doctor

Conversation Starters

If you are on an antidepressant and still feeling depressed, that may not seem like the easiest thing to bring up with your doctor. So if you’re having trouble finding the right thing to say, consider these conversation starters and feel free to put them in your own words.

"We've been treating with the same antidepressant for a while now, but I'm still experiencing some symptoms.
Is there something more we can do to treat them?"
"My antidepressant is helping, but my depression is still affecting me at work, at home, and in my social life.
Should we consider adding something else?"
"I'm glad I’ve made some progress on my antidepressant, but I'm not feeling as well as I'd like to.
What else can we do without starting over?"
Bookmark this page for your next appointment.
Tools for Talking With Your Doctor

ABILIFY Discussion Guide

If you’ve been on an antidepressant for at least 6 weeks and still feel depressed, adding ABILIFY (aripiprazole) could be right for you. To find out, review the questions below and discuss them with your doctor.

  • How might ABILIFY help treat my unresolved symptoms of depression?
  • Does adding ABILIFY mean I have to change my current treatment?
  • How is ABILIFY thought to work?
  • What side effects should I know about?
  • How soon might I start to see improvement in my symptoms?
  • Based on my overall health and current treatment, might ABILIFY be right for me?
Bookmark this page for your next appointment.

Important Safety Information

Increases in blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) can happen in some people who take ABILIFY (aripiprazole). Extremely high blood sugar can lead to coma or death. If you have diabetes, or risk factors (for example, obesity, family history of diabetes), or have the following symptoms: increases in thirst, urination, or hunger, feel weak or tired, sick to your stomach, or confused (or breath smells fruity), your blood sugar should be monitored. See More Safety Information

"At every appointment, I would make sure that I came in with a list of questions that we could go over." —Kalene, real ABILIFY patient

Kalene is taking ABILIFY (aripiprazole) along with her antidepressant to help treat her unresolved symptoms of depression. She has volunteered to share her experience and has not been paid by the makers of ABILIFY. Individual results may vary.

Home
Next

You May Not Have to Start Over  

Your Answers to the Depression Questionnaire

If you’ve been on an antidepressant for at least 6 weeks and still feel depressed, this simple
questionnaire can help you discuss your symptoms with your doctor. So be sure to print this out and
bring it to your next appointment.

 
  • Rating Guidelines
  • 0: Not at all  
  • 1: Rarely true (1-2 days)  
  • 2: Sometimes true (3-4 days)  
  • 3: Often true (5-6 days)  
  • 4: Almost always true (every day)

Please note: This is not a diagnostic
tool. Only a healthcare professional
can diagnose depression.

Always follow the healthcare advice
of your doctor. Do not change the
way you take your medication without
talking to your doctor.

During the past week, including today:

  • 1.

    I felt sad or depressed

  • 2.

    I was not as interested in my usual activities

  • 3.

    My appetite was poor and I didn't feel like eating

  • 4.

    My appetite was much greater than usual

  • 5.

    I had difficulty sleeping

  • 6.

    I was sleeping too much

  • 7.

    I felt very fidgety, making it difficult to sit still

  • 8.

    I felt physically slowed down, like my body was stuck in mud

  • 9.

    My energy level was low

  • 10.

    I felt guilty

  • 11.

    I thought I was a failure

  • 12.

    I had problems concentrating

  • 13.

    I had more difficulties making decisions than usual

  • 14.

    I wished I was dead

  • 15.

    I thought about killing myself

  • 16.

    I thought that the future looked hopeless

Overall, how much have symptoms of depression
interfered with or caused difficulties in your life
during the past week?

  • a) Not at all
  • b) A little bit
  • c) A moderate amount
  • d) Quite a bit
  • e) Extremely

If you ever have suicidal thoughts, call your doctor or 911, or got to the emergency room. Take suicidal thoughts seriously and get help immediately.


INDICATION:
ABILIFY is prescribed as an add-on treatment for adults with depression when an antidepressant alone is not enough.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION:
Elderly people with psychosis related to dementia (for example, an inability to perform daily activities as a result of increased memory loss), treated with antipsychotic medicines including ABILIFY, are at an increased risk of death compared to placebo. ABILIFY is not approved for the treatment of people with dementia-related psychosis (see Boxed WARNING).

Antidepressants may increase suicidal thoughts or behaviors in some children, teenagers, and young adults, especially within the first few months of treatment or when the dose is changed. Depression and other serious mental illnesses are themselves associated with an increase in the risk of suicide. Patients on antidepressants and their families or caregivers should watch for new or worsening depression symptoms, unusual changes in behavior, or thoughts of suicide. Such symptoms should be reported to the patient's healthcare provider right away, especially if they are severe or occur suddenly. ABILIFY is not approved for use in pediatric patients with depression (see Boxed WARNING).

Please see continued IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION on page 2 and U.S. FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION, including Boxed WARNINGS, and Medication Guide at AddABILIFY.com.

 

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION (continued) for ABILIFY® (aripiprazole)

Contraindication: Patients should not use ABILIFY if they are allergic to aripiprazole or any of the ingredients in ABILIFY. Allergic reactions have ranged from rash, hives and itching to anaphylaxis, which may include difficulty breathing, tightness in the chest, and swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue.

Serious side effects may include:

  • An increased risk of stroke and ministroke have been reported in clinical studies of elderly people with dementia-related psychosis
  • High fever, stiff muscles, confusion, sweating, changes in pulse, heart rate and blood pressure may be signs of a condition called neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS), a rare and serious condition that can lead to death
  • Increases in blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) can happen in some people who take ABILIFY. Extremely high blood sugar can lead to coma or death. If you have diabetes, or risk factors (for example, obesity, family history of diabetes), or have the following symptoms: increases in thirst, urination, or hunger, feel weak or tired, sick to your stomach, or confused (or breath smells fruity), your blood sugar should be monitored
  • Changes in cholesterol and triglyceride (fat, also called lipids) levels in the blood have been seen in patients taking medicines like ABILIFY
  • Weight gain has been reported in patients taking medicines like ABILIFY so your weight should be checked regularly
  • ABILIFY and medicines like it have been associated with difficulty swallowing which may lead to aspiration or choking
  • Uncontrollable movements of face, tongue, or other parts of body, as these may be signs of a serious condition called tardive dyskinesia (TD). TD may not go away, even if you stop taking ABILIFY. TD may also start after you stop taking ABILIFY
  • Orthostatic hypotension (decreased blood pressure) or lightheadedness or fainting when rising too quickly from a sitting or lying position has been reported with ABILIFY
  • Decreases in white blood cells (WBC; infection fighting cells) have been reported in some patients taking ABILIFY. Patients with a history of a significant decrease in WBC count or who have experienced a low WBC count due to drug therapy should have their blood tested and monitored during the first few months of therapy
  • Seizures (convulsions) have been reported with ABILIFY. Tell your healthcare provider if you have a history of or are at risk for seizures
  • ABILIFY and medicines like it can affect your judgment, thinking, or motor skills. You should not drive or operate hazardous machinery until you know how ABILIFY affects you
  • Medicines like ABILIFY can impact your body's ability to reduce body temperature; you should avoid overheating and dehydration
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or intend to become pregnant. Also tell your healthcare provider about any other medical conditions you have and about all prescription and non-prescription medicines you are taking or plan to take since there are some risks for drug interactions

While taking ABILIFY, avoid:

  • Drinking alcohol
  • Breast-feeding an infant

Most common side effects (≥10%) from all clinical trials involving adults:

  • Nausea, vomiting, constipation, headache, dizziness, an inner sense of restlessness or need to move (akathisia), anxiety, insomnia, and restlessness

It is important to contact your healthcare provider if you experience prolonged, abnormal muscle spasms or contractions, which may be signs of a condition called dystonia.

For patients who must limit their sugar intake, ABILIFY Oral Solution contains sugar.

For patients with phenylketonuria or PKU, ABILIFY DISCMELT® (aripiprazole) contains phenylalanine.

If you have any questions about your health or medicines, talk to your healthcare provider.

Please see U.S. FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION, including Boxed WARNINGS, and Medication Guide at AddABILIFY.com.

Tablets manufactured by Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokyo 101-8535, Japan or Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ 08543 USA. Distributed and marketed by Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc., Rockville, MD 20850 USA.

Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc.
© 2013 Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc., Rockville, MD September 2013 03US13EC0100
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